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The World Of The Chelsea Truck Company Defender Wide Track

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published on 2nd September 2015 by Steve Whitaker
Replacing an icon is one of design’s biggest challenges. For some it’s a heavy burden, for some it’s a welcome opportunity.

As the automotive world begins to become even more competitive and as innovation and technologies become comparable between manufacturers, one would say that you need a brand and a design that differentiates itself within the marketplace. 

Cue the Chelsea Truck Company label 

Afzal Kahn devised and implemented his vision for the Chelsea Truck Company Land Rover Defender Wide Track in 2011, and developed a vision for the brand in terms of what he wanted the Defender to look like.

And although standard Defenders are quite polarising – a bit like Marmite, you either love them or you hate them, the design strategy behind the Chelsea Truck Company is all about relevance.

In a world that is changing, designing a vehicle that people want to buy, that resonates with them on an emotional level, but still maintains the essence of the Defender brand, is exactly what the Chelsea Truck Company is all about.

It would be safe to say that the Defender Wide Track styling package has proven its worth in terms of the success of the product. 

British DNA 

The key point has been satisfying the demands of the consumer base without compromising the company’s British design ethos. A point which the Chelsea Truck Company’s Dharmesh Patel is keen to highlight:

“In terms of the vehicle’s core DNA, people are buying our products because they concur with the British philosophy and that’s what we want,” said Patel.

“That’s not to say, though, that you can’t create certain specifications based on cultural differences – the number of seats, perhaps, or the size of the vehicles, just look at the Huntsman range of vehicles.

“In our line of work you can only be successful if people admire your vehicles and we continue to listen to our customers and deliver the most innovative products and long may that continue.” 
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